Last edited by Araramar
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of Parental control and support as related to adolescent alcohol use found in the catalog.

Parental control and support as related to adolescent alcohol use

David Joseph Courtney

Parental control and support as related to adolescent alcohol use

by David Joseph Courtney

  • 295 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Youth -- Alcohol use.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby David Joseph Courtney.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 66 l.
    Number of Pages66
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16758869M

      Research on adolescent and adult social networks has focused on the impact of peers on risk behaviors involving drugs, tobacco, and alcohol use. Networks may influence individual substance use behavior via the prevalence of substance use within the network as well as the interpersonal dynamics among network members. 9,10 These effects may have serious Cited by:   As well as parental control, involvement in social activities is another protective factor in adolescent alcohol use. Adolescents who demonstrate a high involvement in social activities (sports, extracurricular and/or academic activities), are less likely to consume alcohol or other by: 5.

    iv Preventing Drug Use among Children and Adolescents National Institute on Drug Abuse Preface v Today’s youth face many risks, including drug abuse, violence, and HIV/AIDS. Responding to these risks before they become problems can be difficult. Parental knowledge of adolescent activities, such as knowing what adolescents are doing, where they are going, and whom they are with, has been linked to many beneficial outcomes for adolescents, including lower rates of delinquency and substance use (Soenens et al. ; Yun et al. ).Parental knowledge is also related to several aspects of subjective well being, such as depression, low Author: Scott A. Desmond.

    Addictive use: craving for use now couples with the compulsion to rely on habitual self-destructive substance use to survive. The bad news is that by the end of high school most teenagers have at. Addicted Like Me: a Mother-Daughter Story of Substance Abuse and Recovery. Karen Franklin & Lauren King, $ Addicted Like Me is the story of a mother and her daughter and the legacy of addiction that runs through their family. From the perspective of two people who have been there, the authors provide advice and resources to help parents help their kids before problems arise.


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Parental control and support as related to adolescent alcohol use by David Joseph Courtney Download PDF EPUB FB2

Current study and expectancies. We longitudinally investigated the direct effect of parental problem drinking on adolescent alcohol use, the role of alcohol-specific and general parenting practices in this relationship, and the reciprocal effects of adolescent alcohol use on parenting (see Fig.

1).It was expected that parental problem drinking would have a direct positive effect on adolescent Cited by: CECILIA A. ESSAU, DELYSE HUTCHINSON, in Adolescent Addiction, Parental Support.

Parental support is a key dimension of effective parenting, incorporating constructs such as nurturing, attachment, acceptance, cohesion and love (Jacob and Leonard, ).Parental support has been defined as “parental behaviors toward the child, such as praising, encouraging and giving physical affection.

Parental problem drinking, parenting, and adolescent alcohol use Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Behavioral Medicine 31(3) July with 87 Reads How we measure 'reads'. We hypothesized that more parental alcohol use, more parental alcohol-related problems, and tolerant alcohol-specific attitudes lead to more excessive alcohol use and alcohol-related problems in adolescents.

Finally, these models were tested for mothers and fathers separately. See Fig. 1 for both the indirect and the direct path by: Whether the relationship between parental control and adolescents' drinking is moderated by parental attachment was also examined.

Consistent with other studies, attachment and strict control were cross-sectionally related to adolescents' alcohol use at all 3 by: This study examined whether parental alcohol use in adolescence, adulthood, and for mothers, during pregnancy, was related to their young children's functioning in terms of their on-time.

The present study examined whether parental problem drinking affected parenting (i.e., behavioral control, support, rule-setting, alcohol-specific behavioral control), and whether parental problem drinking and parenting affected subsequent adolescent alcohol use over time.

A total of families, consisting of both parents and two adolescents (mean age and years at Time 1 Cited by: Variables such as parent unavailability, family quality, peer acceptance/self-esteem, and deviant peer involvement serve as mediators between parental divorce and adolescent alcohol use.

TRUE Regardless of intactness of family of origin, BLANK is an important factor in adolescent alcohol use. Past research has generated inconsistent findings regarding the relation of parental control and support to adolescent problem behaviors.

Using two waves of data collected 1 year apart, the current study examined the influence of parental control and support on adolescents' externalizing symptoms, alcohol use, and illicit substance use. A sample of adolescents and their parents (@#@ N Cited by: Adolescent Alcohol Use Another reason for concern about adolescent alcohol use is the risk of serious social, medical, and legal problems that can result from alcohol consumption, such as impaired per-formance at school or work; inter-personal problems with friends, family members, teachers, and supervisors; physical and psychological impairment.

The present study examined whether parental problem drinking affected parenting (i.e., behavioral control, support, rule-setting, alcohol-specific behavioral control), and whether parental problem drinking and parenting affected subsequent adolescent alcohol use over by: particularly parenting influences— that are relevant to the development of alcohol abuse and dependence in the offspring.1 This discussion includes two types of family influences: alco-hol-specific and non-alcohol-specific effects.

Alcohol-specific effects re-flect the impact of parental alcohol use and abuse on the child’s alcoholFile Size: 36KB. Parental Support and Control as Predictors of Adolescent Drinking, Delinquency, and Related Problem Behaviors This study uses a representative general popula-tion sample of adolescents and their families to examine the effects of parenting practices, par-ticularly support and control, on the development of adolescent drinking, delinquency.

There is ample evidence that parents and the quality of the parent–child relationship have an influence on the alcohol use of adolescents. Important factors in this are parental monitoring, communication, parenting behaviours, attitudes and family functioning [1–7].Positive family dynamics, parental monitoring [], family bonding [] and alcohol-specific rules [10–12] serve as protective Cited by: 5.

adolescent alcohol use and both control and support were prospectively related to adolescent alcohol use. The authors concluded adolescents who receive either extreme of parental support or control are at risk for problem behaviours.

Parental attachment One factor that would seem likely to influence the relationship between monitoring and. Adolescence is a critical time for the potential initiation and escalation of alcohol use.

New findings underscore the impact of parental drinking and parenting practices on adolescent drinking. This study investigates the relationship between parental drinking and school adjustment in a total population sample of adolescents, with independent reports from mothers, fathers, and adolescents.

As a group, children of alcohol abusers have previously been found to exhibit lowered academic achievement. However, few studies address which parts of school adjustment that may be Cited by:   It helps commissioners to understand the extent of problem parental alcohol and drug use in their area and how this can impact on children aged between 0.

higher odds of binge consumption, alcohol-related harm, and DSM symptoms of alcohol dependence and of DSM alcohol use disorder, but parental supply was not associated with symptoms of DSM alcohol abuse, after control for covariates.

• Supply from non-parental sources was associated with significant risks of all these outcomes. A new study of adolescent drinking has found that the interaction of specific genes and parental rules may determine whether a teen will have alcohol-related problems in the future.

Teen drinking has lasting health consequences. "A lot of adolescents experiment with alcohol and drugs," says Windle. "Some of them will use these substances long term, and others will stop.Because alcohol use is normalized in families with alcoholism, children can often struggle to distinguish between good role models and bad ones.

As a result, many will end up feeling conflicted, confused, and self-conscious when they realize that drinking is not considered normal in other families.To explore the co-evolution of friendship tie choice and alcohol use behavior among 1, adolescents from 12 small schools and adolescents from one big school sampled in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (AddHealth), we apply a Stochastic Actor-Based (SAB) approach implemented in the R-based Simulation Investigation for Empirical Network Analysis (RSiena) package.